2018 Holden Commodore Tourer crash test results

2018 Holden Calais Tourer crash test

The 2018 Holden Commodore Tourer has been crash tested by ANCAP, the Australian New Car Assessment Program, and has received a five star safety rating.

The lifted all-wheel-drive crossover, which comes only in Calais Tourer spec, now matches the rest of the Commodore range which also gained five stars in crash testing.

The crossover is a spiritual successor to the Holden Adventra, being an off-road capable version of the family sedan. However, an interesting detail in ANCAP’s report is that the Calais Tourer wasn’t tested in Australia. Instead, it was the Commodore’s donor vehicle, the Opel Insignia, which was tested by EuroNCAP (you can see the video below) with ANCAP then translating the scores.

This is a stark departure for Holden, which has locally tested Commodores for their safety score. Also interesting is the fact that the vehicle tested was a left-hand-drive vehicle, and not with the V6 which the Calais Tourer will be fitted with. Instead, it was a 2.0-litre diesel front wheel drive model.

The 3.6-litre V6 makes 230kW and 370Nm, matched to a nine speed automatic which then runs to the Twinster all-wheel drive system, so certainly a different vehicle to the one that was crash tested.

2018 Holden Calais Tourer snow

ANCAP says that despite the testing being done on the European Insignia, “locally supplied variants [will be] offering comparable safety performance”.

The Commodore received the following scores in each category, according to ANCAP.

  • 93% – Adult Occupant Protection
  • 85% – Child Occupant Protection
  • 78% – Pedestrian Protection
  • 77% – Safety Assist

Again, these are translated scores, and while crash testing only covers some of the score, the active safety systems are what got it over the line. The Calais Tourer’s standard autonomous emergency braking (AEB) and active lane-keep assist helped to achieve the full five stars. Also fitted is adaptive suspension, 360-degree camera, adaptive cruise control and matrix lighting.

Holden also says that its all-wheel-drive system will read the road 100 times every second ensuring that the wheels which need power the most are supplied with drive.

About Karl Peskett 406 Articles
A passionate writer, editor and driver, Karl is the go-to man when it comes to four wheels. With stints in television, radio, print and online, Karl has been writing about cars for more than a decade. He drives around 100 vehicles every year and has tested everything from Bugattis to Suzukis. Sometimes on track, sometimes off-road, his focus is on producing objective journalism without fear or favour.

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